Tag Archives: exploded view

Acorn Electron (1983)

Acorn Electron

I have to thank my English aunt for this computer (she shipped it to me in Italy) and one of her walking companions, the original owner. Some time ago I received an e-mail from my aunt, who wrote “I think you will be amazed by what I have”, and included a detailed list of all the items she was given: the computer in its original box, a tape reader, magazines, games, books; the box arrived a few days later… and I really was amazed! Continue reading

Restoring an Apple Macintosh II

Apple Macintosh II

My thanks to Ettore for the donation of this complete system: a Macintosh II, a 13″ AppleColor High-Resolution RGB Monitor, a mouse and a keyboard. Ettore wrote to me that he had a Macintosh II upgraded to IIfx that he wanted to get rid of, but he didn’t want to take it to a landfill. Unfortunately not many people have the time or will to send a couple of boxes and often these old machines are dumped. Continue reading

Commodore Amiga 1000 (1985)

Commodore Amiga 1000

Today, July 23rd 2014, the Amiga turns 29: it was presented in 1985. That year my parents bought a Commodore 128, while my first Amiga, model 500, arrived in 1988. As always I won’t discuss the technical details of this revolutionary computer, but I will pay my tribute with a set of photographs. Continue reading

Atari VCS (1977)

Atari 2600

Last Sunday, like every second Sunday of the month, I went to the flea market of Udine (I live 10 minutes away from the city). I hadn’t found anything interesting in months, but this time I brought home an Atari VCS, renamed “2600” a few years later, with a dozen games and some instruction booklets, but without joysticks or paddles. Continue reading

Commodore 4040 dual drive floppy disk (1980)

Commodore 4040 - Front

This is one of the floppy drive models marketed by Commodore for its business line of computers. Before turning it on I made a thorough cleaning, but when I tested it, it didn’t work properly. For example, the command to list the content of a floppy disk showed the wrong characters and after a few attempts nothing was displayed at all. I started to try all the socketed ICs on other drives to search for the fault, but they were all working; then I re-connected the drive to a PET and it functioned perfectly. Probably a few IC pins were oxidized. Continue reading